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Friday, July 1, 2011

Surrounded by Green

I am fortunate to live where I do, and often times when I am out on my outdoor adventures, I find myself surrounded by green. Our damp environment may be undesirable to some because of the amount of rainfall and overcast days, but to me it creates a heavenly environment that is worth it. This was taken up at Trillium Lake on one of those type of days. The foggy cold dampness kept the crowds of people indoors that day, and the normally packed dock was deserted.

City Daily Photo's theme for July is "Green". Click here to view thumbnails for all participants




Thursday, June 30, 2011

Ring around the sun


What does a ring around the sun mean? My mom says it is a change in the weather, and I believe her. Within an hour of taking this blue sky photo of the sun, the clouds rolled in and it has been overcast and raining on and off since!

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Bridal Veil Falls


Back to the waterfall photos I took in the Columbia River Gorge a few weekends ago. As I mentioned in last weeks post, we hiked in to Bridal Veil Falls. The Historic Columbia River Highway passes over the falls (you can see the bridge at the top of the photo), and you take a path to the bottom of the falls. Recently the falls was in the local news because a group of teenagers risked their lives and kayaked over the falls.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Mt St Helens


I visited this ex-peak this past weekend. Back on May 18, 1980, a huge volcanic explosion rocked the Pacific Northwest and left the once perfect cone mountain in rubble. Now, 31 years later, things look better. But it won't be a lush forest again in our lifetime. Things are still barely starting to come back to life. The devastation is hard to believe, and even harder to capture in photo.

(Sorry ABC Wednesdayers - X is SO hard. Forgive my Ex-peak and Ex-plosion LOL!)

Monday, June 27, 2011

Bear Grass



This pretty mountain flower is abundant up in the forest around here. Apparently the leaves of the plant were long used by Native Americans in basket making, as they are durable and once dried, turn white and are easy to dye.